Weekly Reflection

As part of my work as Manager, Campus Ministry for the University of Notre Dame Australia I write a weekly refection on the coming Sunday's Gospel and email it to all staff and students of the Fremantle Campus. This then is the weekly blog of those reflections, based on the Gospel readings for Sundays, as per the lectionary of the Roman Missal of Paul VI. Should these reflections find any readership whatsoever, I hope that it is edifying.
The title of my blog is taken from the English translation of Cardinal John Henry Newman's memorial epitaph, which was inscribed on his memorial plaque at the Birmingham Oratory.

Ex umbris et imaginibus in veritatem - Through Shadows and Images to Truth

Friday, February 19, 2016

21 February 2016 - Second Sunday of Lent

 Gospel Lk9:28-36 
“It is wonderful for us to be here”
When one pictures the kind of fantastical event as described here, it can seem that Peter’s reaction is a little simple or even childish. Set aside from the other disciples, he along with John and James are brought up the mountain to pray with Jesus where they witness something truly out of this world.
James and John are not recorded as having said or done anything in response to what they had witnessed, and perhaps we can assume that they were so moved that they felt it best to respect the solemnity of the moment with silence.
Peter, on the other hand bombastically fumbles forward, as he often does, speaking before he’s had time to think. Seemingly overwhelmed with excitement he says to Jesus stating, what must have been absolutely obvious, how great it is that he’s there to see all this unfolding. Then he embarrassingly suggests that they set up camp here and spend the rest of their lives enjoying these good times.
Peter obviously does not know the difficult times that lie ahead - not just for Jesus, but for him and all the rest of the disciples, this ‘mountaintop experience’ or time of consolation is perhaps gifted to them by Jesus as a means by which they can get through the tough times, or times of desolation.

Like Peter we often find ourselves nostalgic for the good times, and in our own childish way can find ourselves wishing that nothing will ever change. Yet perhaps we can recognise that these good times, or times of consolation are gifted to us, to help maintain us on the right path when times get tough or things become uncertain.

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